We Hold These Truths: Perspectives on Health Disparities, Racial Identities & Cultural Humility

The Trust is excited to announce our new program “We Hold These Truths” as part of our Virtual Webinar Series. This 4-part series will examine how societal issues, including racial injustice, movements for racial equity, health disparities, and adverse experiences due to systemic racism, have historically impacted communities of color.

Each part is free of charge to all Trust policyholders. Our panel of experts will offer perspectives on how the field of psychology has traditionally addressed these issues and discuss how the rise of the social justice movement has impacted psychology’s current response to these issues. We’ll analyze the impact of the current intersection of two pandemics: COVID-19 and racial injustices on Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and on White people in this country.

Particular attention will be paid to the history and current role psychology plays in addressing these issues. The need for understanding White racial identity (Whiteness) and its unexamined influence, as well as the importance of developing cultural humility, will be explored.

Descriptions and learning objectives are listed below. Both live and on-demand versions offer the number of CE. Please click on the live event date and time to register. Each live event must be registered for separately. To view the on-demand version, simply click on the part number.

Part 1 [On-demand - Coming Soon] Intersectional Perspectives on the Pandemic, Cultural Fissures and Calls for Change

1 CE Credit

Jana Martin, Ph.D., CEO (Moderator); Brenda Ingram, Ed.D., LCSW; Kisha Holden, Ph.D., MSCR
1 Hour


Part 2 [Live] - November 9th | 5-6:30pm ET - Systemic Racism in Psychology: National Ethnic Minority Psychological Association Perspectives

1.5 CE Credits

Fred Millan, Ph.D., ABPP, NCC, Trustee (Moderator); Helen H. Hsu, Psy.D. (AAPA); Theopia Jackson, Ph.D. (ABPsi); Ayse Ikizler, Ph.D. (AMENA-Psy); Andrea Romero, Ph.D. (NLPA); Wendy Peters, Ph.D. (SIP)
1.5 Hours


Part 3 [Live] - November 19th | 5-6pm ET - Whiteness, White Supremacy and White Privilege

1 CE Credit

Lori Thomas, J.D., Ph.D., Trustee (Moderator); Janet Helms, Ph.D.; Helen Neville, Ph.D.
1 Hour


Part 4 [Live] - December 17th | 5-6pm ET - Cultural Humility: An Ethical Imperative

1 CE Credit

Josephine D. Johnson Ph.D., Trustee (Moderator); Miguel Gallardo, Psy.D.; Thema Bryant-Davis, Ph.D.
1 Hour


Descriptions & Learning Objectives

Part 1: Intersectional Perspectives on the Pandemic, Cultural Fissures and Calls for Change

Our panel of experts explore psychological perspectives and actions on the recent confluence of the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 and its intersection with the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement on communities of color and other communities. The dual pandemics of systemic racism and COVID-19 have led governments to declare racism a “public health crisis.” How does this manifest in the mental health of communities of Black, Indigenous, People of Color? The discussion will focus on how these dual pandemics have impacted the conversations psychologists are having in the workplace, with colleagues, and with clients.

The experts will offer suggestions on how psychologists in a variety of settings can address comments ranging from insensitive to overtly racist. Do these responses differ depending on whether one is perceived as a member of the majority or minority culture? If so, how?

Objectives:

  1. Define trauma, racial trauma and trauma-informed care. 
  2. Recognize signs of trauma and racial trauma.
  3. Articulate the theory of intersectionality.
  4. Apply a trauma-informed framework to their practice skills.
  5. Describe trauma-informed practices to address healing from racial trauma and COVID-19.
  6. Identify the impact of psychosocial, sociocultural and environmental issues on health equity.
  7. Delineate strategies for coping with the interrelated complexities of COVID-19 and mental health.


Part 2: Systemic Racism in Psychology: National Ethnic Minority Psychological Association Perspectives

Representatives from each of the National Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations (American Arab, Middle Eastern and North African Psychological Association [AMENA-Psy], Asian-American Psychological Association [AAPA], Association of Black Psychologists [ABPsi], National Latinx Psychological Association [NLPA] and Society of Indian Psychologists [SIP]) provide historical perspectives on how the field of psychology has traditionally addressed issues of racial inequity.

The discussion will focus on their individual and collective experiences of how conventional psychology or the traditional Western practice of psychology has been well- or ill-suited to address issues of race, culture, and disparities in access to mental health. The experts will compare and contrast how their culturally specific approaches to mental health have addressed these concerns.

The experts will offer suggestions on what psychologists can do within their communities, professional organizations, and/or workplace settings to decrease racial disparities in access to behavioral health care.

Objectives:

  1. Describe how systemic racism has and does impact all Americans with specific attention to the communities served by the respective Associations.
  2. Name at least three effective culturally-centered responses promoted by the National Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations in countering the impact of systemic racism.
  3. Identify strategies to dismantle systemic racism within the discipline of psychology and at community levels.


Part 3: Whiteness, White Supremacy and White Privilege

The presenters will discuss white racial identity (Whiteness) and its relationship to White supremacy and White racism. The presenters will define these concepts, offer perspectives on how they influence our interactions in therapeutic and other work settings.

Suggestions will also be offered on what psychologists can do within their communities, professional organizations, and/or workplace settings to acknowledge the impact of our collective use of Whiteness as the prototype for normative interactions and how this may sustain narratives of White supremacy and White racism.

Objectives:

  1. Define the terms White racial identity, White supremacy and White racism.
  2. Describe the intersectionality of Whiteness/White supremacy and institutional racism.
  3. Identify internalized notions of white supremacy and learn strategies to address White racism in a variety of work settings.


Part 4: Cultural Humility: An Ethical Imperative

For more than 30 years, cultural competence has been acknowledged as being central to providing effective therapy, typically in cross-cultural counseling, but also in identifying important areas of difference that may go unaddressed in presumed areas of similarity (e.g., similar race but economic or religious differences). It has generally been described as having three main components: attitudes/beliefs, knowledge and skills (D. W. Sue, Arredondo, & McDavis, 1992; D. W. Sue et al., 1982).

In recent years, “cultural humility” has gained ascendance as a key concept. Across studies, cultural humility has been defined as involving (a) a lifelong motivation to learn from others, (b) critical self-examination of cultural awareness, (c) interpersonal respect, (d) developing mutual partnerships that address power imbalances, and (e) an other-oriented stance open to new cultural information (Mosher, Hook, Farrell, Watkins, & Davis, 2017).

The presenters will explore this evolution and make the argument that cultural humility is an ongoing, active process incorporated into all practice and should be considered an ethical requirement. They will also offer suggestions for lifelong learning and application of this imperative.

Objectives:

  1. Differentiate the concepts of cultural competence and cultural humility.
  2. Identify how cultural humility should be considered an ethical imperative.
  3. Describe ways to incorporate cultural humility into various areas of psychological practice.